Ask Us Questions Answered

 


Why are there two signs in the Rosenwald community pointing vehicles/people to downtown Brevard? One sign is at Carolina Avenue and Cashiers Valley Road, and the other sign is at the junction of Carver, Oakdale and Cashiers Valley Road. These two signs point to downtown but don’t get you there.

The signs in question were recently installed as part of the City’s Wayfinding System, Planning Director Josh Freeman said. Signs are located at the intersection of Cashiers Valley Road and Carolina Avenue, and at the intersection of Carver Street, Oakdale Street, and Cashiers Valley Road.

A third sign, once installed, will be located at the intersection of Carver Street, Morgan Street and Oaklawn Avenue and will direct drivers to West Main Street. Together, these three signs will direct travelers along Cashiers Valley Road to downtown Brevard.


How can it cost $100,000 to do an environmental assessment of the vacant site opposite Rice Furniture store, develop a master plan for the property’s remediation and reuse, and have a traffic analysis and master planning for the Probart/Caldwell street intersection?

It is unlikely that it will cost $100,000 to do an environmental assessment of the vacant site opposite Rice Furniture store, develop a master plan for the property’s remediation and reuse, and have a traffic analysis and master planning for the Probart/Caldwell street intersection, Planning Director Josh Freeman said.

However, City Council has allocated $100,000 to cover those four tasks with contingency funding to cover any unexpected sub-tasks that may arise, such as surveying work or similar.

Any unexpended funds will be reallocated to other purposes upon completion of the project.

How can it cost $100,000 to develop a master plan and construction/bid documents for Clemson Park (beside the movie theatre in downtown Brevard), when the property is so small?

It is unlikely that it will cost $100,000 to master plan and prepare construction/bid documents for Clemson Park, Planning Director Josh Freeman said.

However, City Council has allocated $100,000 to cover those tasks with contingency funding to cover any unexpected sub-tasks that may arise, such as surveying work or similar. Any unexpended funds will be reallocated to other purposes upon completion of the project.


What is the Norton Creek Greenway? Where does it start? Why does it cost $2.9 million. Whose property must be taken to build the path?

In 2007, Brevard City Council adopted a Comprehensive Pedestrian Plan for the city, according to Plannign Director Josh Freeman.

This plan, which was based upon extensive public input, identified a series of 10 new greenway projects (also referred to as “multi-use paths” or “bike /hike paths”) throughout the city. For ease of description and discussion, city staff informally uses the term “Norton Creek Greenway” to refer to Priority # 6, Priority # 7, and Priority # 9 as identified in the Comprehensive Pedestrian Plan.

City staff uses the term “Norton Creek Greenway” because the aforementioned projects generally follow Norton Creek, which originates near Bracken Preserve and joins Nicholson Creek near Brevard High School before terminating at the French Broad River.

The purposes of priority projects 6, 7 and 9 are as follows: 1) to provide safe recreation and pedestrian / bicycle infrastructure within the Rosenwald community; 2) to connect the Rosenwald community to other parts of the city of via safe recreation and pedestrian / bicycle infrastructure; 3) to connect Bracken Preserve and Brevard Music Center to other parts of the city via safe recreation and pedestrian / bicycle infrastructure; 4) to connect Brevard High School to other parts of the city via safe recreation and pedestrian /bicycle infrastructure; and 5) to tie all parts of the city together via a continuous north/south greenway system (i.e., Lowes in North Brevard/Pisgah Forest to Brevard High School in the south, and the various neighborhoods that lie therein between).

The alignment of the Norton Creek Greenway (priority projects 6, 7 and 9) as depicted in the Comprehensive Pedestrian Plan is highly conceptual. The actual route will only be determined through a more detailed engineering/design process. Until that is complete, it is not possible to provide a specific answer to the question, “Whose property must be taken to build the path?”

The most specific answer that can be given is that the greenway will begin somewhere within the Rosenwald community and connect to downtown Brevard, Brevard High School, Brevard Music Center and Bracken Preserve; beyond that, no specific alignment has been identified.

Because no specific alignment has been identified, there are no firm cost projections for the Norton Creek Greenway (priority projects 6, 7 and 9) at this time. City staff has prepared a rough estimate of cost for preliminary budgeting purposes only; this estimate was developed using the analogous estimating method, which produces an “order of magnitude” cost estimate based upon other, similar construction projects and current material prices.

Using this approach, city staff estimates that the project may cost up to $2.9 million, including engineering/design, right-of-way acquisition, utility relocation, grading and construction. This number is highly speculative and it will be refined when a specific alignment can be identified. At the present time, there is no funding or implementation timeline associated with this project.

 
 

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